A Moveable Feast

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A Moveable Feast – Ernest Hemingway.
This book made me hungry for the smell of French pastry, the sound of Cole Porter and the sights of Parisian skylines. I’ve only ever visited Paris once and that was a fateful trip to Disneyland in my formative years which resulted in my family being stuck on the English Channel in the middle of a storm for ELEVEN HOURS. It was very traumatic. I don’t travel well on boats. Hemingway’s memories of paris are much better. He tells tales of road trips with a hypochondriac named Scott Fitzgerald, of visits to Shakespeare and Co, of culture, fine dining and conversations with Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein. This whole book made me want to give up everything and move to Paris

A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway’s most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized

Hemingway is one of those writers who I greatly admire and am hugely fascinated with, but when it comes to reading his work, I have to be in the mood for it . His writing style is very poetic and honest, but its sometimes a bit style over substance. A bit like Fitzgerald I suppose. A moveable feast was a bit like that in some instances. I’ve wanted to read it since watching Midnight in Paris, just to see Hemingway’s point of view when it comes to that generation of writers. I enjoyed it immensely and learning about his life and exploits was fascinating but I was a little disappointed at the lack of Hadley. I had thought there would be more mention of her. I also assumed that this would be a chronological autobiography, but it read more like a little anthology of memories, which isn’t a bad thing, just unexpected.

I genuinely loved the mentions of the Fitzgeralds, no prizes for guessing why
no prizes for guessing why, his ego boosting examination and museum trip with Scott was hilarious and his description of him, saying he was beautiful, makes me think that Hemingway, perhaps had such an intense hatred of Zelda for an entirely different reason than he gives.

I particulalry love my copy of this book, I was deliberately searching for this cover because it features Shakespeare and Co in the background and I am so desperate to visit that shop. One day, one day *stares wistfully into the distance* I’ll go and I’ll post hipster photos of the shop front on Instagram.

This version has some lovely additions from Patric and Sean Hemingway, which ahd a nice touch and some notes from Ernest in the back.
All in all, it’s fabulous and I’d like to write my own version when I finally get to Paris.
This and Journey into mystery (my last review) are both continuations of my six week challenge where I have to write a review for every book I read between the 1st November and the 13th December, unfortunately, I couldn’t really make a big deal about this on my Journey Into Mystery post because WORDPRESS HATES ME.
Or at least it does for some reason currently and I’m having to post this from computers that I shouldn’t be posting it from. Shhh.

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2 thoughts on “A Moveable Feast

  1. Pingback: End of the year book survey – The Perks of Being a Bookworm

  2. Pingback: Top 5… – The Perks of Being a Bookworm

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